Resources — 5 Minutes for Special Needs

Resources



                               

When Zoe was little I spent a lot of time thinking  ( and writing) about about how different she was. Then she grew, and through her grade school years blossomed with the encouragement to try and do her best as I made sure she was always included, and treated just like everyone else.

Zoe will be starting sixth grade next year, and growing into who she is meant to be. She is quick to laugh and smile, full of pre-teen sass.

I have always maintained my own set of rules for Mothering Zoe. Many of them involve not making a big deal about her disabilities, within our family .. even in small ways. [click to continue]



                               

This post may contain affiliate links. When you use them, you support this site. Thank you!
See our Disclosure Policy for details.

Message for ALL Mom’s.. LOVE your kids, as if they were dying..

My day had started like any other, I was up at 5 packing lunches and backpacks, while trying to gulp down some coffee. I had an appointment at the office later, so I spent a few minutes standing in front of my closet perplexed and sighing. I looked in the mirror, briefly noting the major damage 40 plus years and nightly interrupted sleep can bring.  Finally, by 7 am, we were all dressed and ready, so we hit the road to drop Zoe’s big sister O, at her school first.

Later, it was just Zoe and I in the car. The sun was streaming through the car windows, the radio was on and I was trying to make Zoe laugh.. 

Read the full article →
 


                                       

Rebuilding Life – An Interview With a Pro Who “Gets” Us

You know those stories we all tell about our kids’ care team professionals who don’t have a clue? The ones who clearly don’t know at all what life is like outside their 15-minute office visit with our child and her challenges? My guest today is NOT one of those professionals! Harriet Cabelly is a Life Coach who’s also a mom of an grown child with special needs. She specializes in helping individuals and families rebuild their lives – and grow into even better ones – despite challenges they face. I’m excited to introduce her to everyone here today!

Q: Harriet, please tell us a little about you and what you do.

Read the full article →
 


                                       

The Hardest Word I’ve Ever Said

Seven years. Over a thousand hours at hospitals and specialist appointments. Countless interventions at home. And it turns out the most important word to help my daughter’s treatment is this:

NO.

No… we’re not doing a nineteenth round of medication adjustments. It’s time for hospitalization.

No… I won’t take her home from the hospital and keep doing the things that haven’t worked in the past.

No… I won’t take her home, period. She needs more help than we can give her. It’s time for residential placement.

No… We’re not going to let her case be assigned to an intern at your teaching facility.

Read the full article →
 


                                       

Speak NOW for Kids

Speak Now for Kids is an advocacy campaign of the National Association of Children’s Hospitals (N.A.C.H.) designed to engage child advocates in communicating with Congress before they cut funding for two key children’s health care programs: Medicaid, which funds health care coverage for one in three children in the U.S. and the Children’s Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGME) program which funds pediatric residency training.

Children cannot have a voice in making their needs known. We ARE that voice on their behalf.

SpeakNowForKids.org

You can help! I’m asking you to send a direct message to a member of Congress (They’re on Twitter!) or use this simple form to contact your representatives quickly and easily.

Read the full article →
 


                                       

The Anonymous Note, Part 2 And Those Kids Who Inspire Special Needs Moms


When my daughter Zoe was a toddler, she didn’t spend her days spreading out her toys and playing on our cool tile floor , or toddling around clutching her favorite doll with sticky juice hands like her big sister Olivia did.

Instead,  Zoe preferred to cuddle for comfort. Her speech didn’t develop until late so I spent a lot of time trying to interpret her sound and movement, solicit a response, and get to know my little one, trying to discern what made her happy and what was making her hurt.

Zoe was 3 years old when she was finally diagnosed, when we learned she would never walk by herself.

Read the full article →
 


                                       

Thrive with Autism – Tips for Those Looking to Understand

Andrea Richardson and Andrea Warner are two teachers who want to help parents Thrive With Autism. We love these tips from www.ThrivingWithAutism.com that they are sharing; both for parents, and for the community who is trying to understand Autism.

Have you ever been in a store, movie theatre, or, yes… even an elevator, and your child has a meltdown? Did the people surrounding you look at you like you were the worst parent around? Or worse, even ask you to control your child?

This is a common situation that many parents face on a daily basis as their children are learning skills needed to manage their environment.

Read the full article →
 


                                       

Soothing An Anxious Child

Some kids just pop out of the womb self-assured and confident. Mine, not so much. Raising 2 former foster kids, assurance is like a foreign language in their minds! It’s been a huge learning process for us to figure out what works and what doesn’t in helping them find confidence in stress.

And I know we’re not alone. It’s a tough world out there. All kids face stress daily! If they’re not struggling to pull themselves up as infants, they’re learning to hold a utensil, or to navigate social dynamics at preschool. Later on, it’s exams, hormones, and jobs. Their special needs add another layer to what’s already a learning process for us all.

Read the full article →
 


                                       

Homework Strategies for Moody Kids

A few weeks back in school and all the old frustrations are in full swing.

The pencil-breaking. The paper-ripping. The weeping. The gnashing of teeth. You’d think schoolwork was, in fact, hell on earth. But really it’s just hell to a child with a learning disability. Especially one that’s at the mercy of bipolar mood swings.

My 4th grader, on an IEP for auditory processing and working memory difficulties, made great strides last year with her resource specialist’s help. That was after 3 years of working with her on homework, only to have her shred her assignment and stomp off, screaming, to her room.

Read the full article →
 


                                       

Summing up Your Special Needs Child

Each new school year I hand over a “parent report” to the child’s new teacher. I wrote a blog post about it at my personal site a couple of years ago. I still think it is one of the most powerful tools in my special needs mom arsenal.  Our report is about five pages long, though I’ve also added an “executive summary” page to  hopefully not overwhelm anyone. Five pages seems like a lot to ask a teacher to read when you think about everything that they already have to do. It also seems like not nearly enough space to really fill them in on this wonderful person I’ve been getting to know for the last seven and a half years…you know the one who can still catch me by surprise when I think I know her so well.

Read the full article →